Fish Eyes of Martha's Vineyard

Photos by Captain Phil Cronin

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The Striped Bass
The Striped Bass
Binomial name Morone saxatilis, the striped bass may be the state fish of Maryland, Rhode Island, South Carolina, and the state Saltwater (marine) fish of New York but it is definately the king of fish in the waters around Martha's Vineyard. The striper is the most sought after gamefish in our waters.

The Striped Bass
The Bluefish
The Bluefish
Binomial name is Pomatomus saltatrix. The bluefish's single row of teeth in each jaw are uniform in size, knife-edged and sharp. Bluefish commonly range in size from seven inch "snappers". They can weigh as much as forty pounds, though fish heavier than twenty pounds are exceptional. Pound for pound they are a terrific battler on light fishing gear.

The Bluefish
The Atlantic Bonito
The Atlantic Bonito
The Atlantic Bonito - binomial name is Sarda sarda but we call them "bones" around the Vineyard. A challenge to catch on the fly rod, they strike with tremendous strength and make strong but erratic runs. This predator uses its excellent vision to capture its prey. The bonito makes wonderful tablefare.

The Atlantic Bonito
The False Albacore
The False Albacore
Binomial name is Euthynnus alletteratus, we call them albies. They feed most heavily on fishes such as herrings, silversides, sandeels, sardines and scads, but they will also readily take squid and crustaceans. They are fast-growing, but short-lived fish. At one year of age and 14 inches, they are mature enough to spawn, which takes place offshore in waters over 100 feet deep. Little tunny seldom live over 5 years. In Vineyard waters they average 7-10 pounds, but can reach 20 pounds. Like the bonito, they have excellent eyesight well adapted for feeding.

The False Albacore
The Black Sea Bass
The Black Sea Bass
Binomial name is Centropristis striata. The average sea bass weighs about 1½ lb. The world record bass is 9 lb 8 oz, but any sea bass above 5 lb is considered a large fish. As a sea bass matures, there are slight variations in their proportions. The smallest sea bass are often nicknamed “pin” bass. Larger fish are nicknamed “humpback” bass because as they grow larger they tend to bulk out just behind the head.

The Black Sea Bass
The Fluke
The Fluke
Binomial name Paralichthys dentatus, The fluke is a flatfish and member of the left-eyed flounder family Brothidae. Fluke, also known as summer flounder, are often considered to be, by far, the most important flounder along the Atlantic coast as it is important to the commercial fishing industry and is also very popular for recreational fishing. Many charter boats, party boats, bait and tackle stores, and any number of businesses associated with boating and angling depend on a viable fluke fishing season. Fishing methods include drifting in a boat or casting from shore, using live or cut baits on a bottom rig and using weighted jigs tipped with strip baits. It is considered an excellent food fish with firm white meat.

The Fluke
The Scup
The Scup
Binomial name Stenotomus chrysops, the scup is a fish which occurs primarily in the Atlantic from Massachusetts to South Carolina. Along with many other fish of the family Sparidae, it is also commonly known as porgy. Scup grow as large as 18 in and weigh 3 to 4 lb, but they average 1/2 - 1 lb.

The Scup
The Longfin Squid
The Longfin Squid
Binomial name Loligo pealei, the Longfin inshore squid have a summer, inshore-northerly spawning migration to shallow coastal and shelf waters, followed by an offshore-southerly retreat in fall and winter to the waters of the continental slope. They are a very important part of our inshore fishery food chain.

The Longfin Squid
The Skate
The Skate
Binomial name Amblyraja badia, Skates are bottom-dwelling and are found throughout the world from continental shelves down to the abyssal zone. They are oviparous fishes, laying eggs in a case known as a mermaid's purse. It is thought that egg-laying in skates is an evolutionary reversal, that is, skates are descended from ovoviviparous ancestors

The Skate
The Horned Sea Robin
The Horned Sea Robin
Binomial name Bellator militaris, Horned Sea robins get their name from their large pectoral fins, which, when swimming, open and close like a bird's wings in flight. They are bottom dwelling fish, living at depths of up to 660 ft. They have an unusually solid skull, and many species also possess armoured plates on the body. Another distinctive feature is the presence of a "drumming muscle" that makes sounds by beating against the swim bladder. Sea robins have six spiny "legs," three on each side. These legs are really flexible spines that were once part of the pectoral fin. The pelvic fins have been thought to let the fish "walk" on the bottom, but are really used to stir up food. When caught, it makes a croaking noise similar to a frog.

The Horned Sea Robin
The Smooth Dogfish
The Smooth Dogfish
The smooth dogfish, Mustelus canis, is a species of shark. A scavenger and opportunistic predator, the smooth dogfish feeds primarily on large crustaceans, including lobsters, shrimp, and crabs, as well as small fish and mollusks. The flat, blunt teeth of the dogfish are used to crush and grind these prey items which have tough outer body coverings. Small fish that are preyed upon by the smooth dogfish include menhaden and tautog. Young smooth dogfish feed on small shrimps, worms, and crabs.

The Smooth Dogfish
Capawock Charters of Martha's Vineyard
Captain Phil Cronin

www.capawock.com